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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT

ACADEMIC CALENDAR CHANGES, RRR WEEK, EXAMS, AND COMMENCEMENT

The Academic Senate has posted new Reading, Review and Recitation (RRR) Guidelines. Please review them there.

[Click on the links in this section to go directly to the answers, or browse the FAQs and their answers below]

CHANGES TO THE ACADEMIC CALENDAR

READING/REVIEW/RECITATION (RRR) WEEK

FINAL EXAMS

MIDTERM EXAMS

COMMENCEMENT

OTHER QUESTIONS


FAQ's ABOUT THE ACADEMIC CALENDAR

  • Why was the academic calendar at UC Berkeley changed beginning in Fall 2009?

    A Joint Task Force on Exams was convened in September 2008 by Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost George Breslauer and Academic Senate Chair Mary Firestone to investigate and address a set of intertwined problems surrounding exam policies and exam administration on campus. Among the Task Force recommendations in the May 2009 report were (1) to clarify, modernize, and streamline Senate procedures for approving alternative forms of final student assessment (other than the traditional three-hour written final exam), (2) to refine campus policies for midterm and final exam scheduling, (3) to revise the academic calendar to accommodate student desire for a longer reading period prior to final exams and to reduce scheduling conflicts for students (such as religious observances and commencement ceremonies), and (4) to improve the communication and dissemination of information related to final exams to instructors, students, and administrators. The campus is now implementing these recommendations, which require modifications to the academic calendar, as described in the following FAQs. [Back]

  • Where can I find the academic calendar for current and future semesters?

    Go to the UC Berkeley Academic Calendar for current and future semesters. [Back]

     

READING/REVIEW/RECITATION (RRR) WEEK

  • What is RRR Week?

    Reading, Review, and Recitation (RRR) Week is the week following the end of formal class instruction and preceding the start of final exams and is intended for students to have free time to prepare for exams, to work on final papers and projects, and to participate in optional review sessions and meetings with instructors. RRR week is based on the pedagogical principle that students benefit from time devoted to synthesizing the course material learned over the course of the semester. In Spring 2009, the Joint Task Force on Exams, after extensive consultation with several Academic Senate committees as well as student and other groups, recommended that a formal review period be created by converting a combination of formal days of class instruction and "dead" days to RRR days. This change formalized a longstanding Academic Senate guideline that no new material be introduced during the last week of instruction. [Back]

  • How is RRR week different from the previous UC Berkeley "dead days" or "dead week"?  UPDATED

    On the old calendar, the term "dead days" referred colloquially to the two days between the end of classes and the start of final exams. "Dead week" referred for some to the 15th week of classes, based on the 1984 and 1991 Academic Senate recommendations that instructors not present any new material the 15th week of classes. This reconfirmed earlier guidelines issued by the UC Office of the President in 1954. In contrast, the new RRR week is intended both to provide more time for students to study between the end of classes and the beginning of final exams and to serve as a time of active engagement between instructors and students for consultations, reviews, and feedback. Instructors are expected to be in attendance as during other days of instruction and to interact with students through individual consultations and/or optional activities that may vary depending on the nature of the course. Thus, RRR days are counted as days of instruction, even though formal classes do not meet during this period. [Back]

  • The academic calendar includes 14 weeks of formal class meetings rather than 15. Does this mean less course material can be covered?  NEW

    In principle, no, if instructors were following the 1984 and 1991 Academic Senate guidelines that no new course material be introduced in the 15th week of classes. Under the new RRR week calendar, there are now 14 weeks of in-class instruction and one RRR week each semester. The number of days of in-class instruction is the same for both spring and fall semesters. UC Berkeley has 68 days of in-class instruction per semester, or 136 days of in-class instruction per academic year. For comparison, the University of Michigan has 135 days of in-class instruction per academic year, MIT has 130, Princeton has 129, and Harvard has 125. [Back]

  • When is the "last day of instruction"?

    The last "day of instruction" corresponds to the last day of the RRR period, since RRR days are counted as days of instruction by the state legislature and in federal financial aid guidelines. The academic calendar now includes a notation for the end of formal classes as well as for the "last day of instruction" to mark this distinction. [Back]

  • What types of learning and teaching activities are encouraged during RRR week?  UPDATED

    The first "R" in "RRR week" stands for "reading." The RRR week is intended to give students time to synthesize and review course material on their own or in small groups and to finish final projects and papers before finals begin, with instructors available for consultation. A number of universities have such "reading periods" between the end of classes and final exams. In addition, other learning and teaching activities may include but are not limited to the following: review sessions, study group meetings, and in some situations, oral presentations and poster sessions (see below for more information). Activities may include both face-to-face and electronic modes of contact and communication. Activities should be optional, except in several special cases noted below. [Back]

  • What types of activities should not be scheduled during RRR week and why?

    Mandatory exams and quizzes or other mandatory scheduled activities should not be scheduled during the RRR week, except as noted below. The RRR week is intended to allow students time to review and synthesize a semester's worth of material; taking exams during this time thus defeats the main purpose of RRR week and, secondarily, could create unfair scheduling conflicts. [Back]

  • "Reading" and "Review" seem clear, but what is meant by "Recitation"?

    "Recitation" refers to an activity in which students present projects or show their mastery of material orally. Examples could include poster sessions, oral presentations of research, and debates. These activities should be optional, except in several special cases noted below. The word "Recitation" is included in the name of the RRR period in order to emphasize that these forms of active engagement are considered appropriate for the RRR period, alongside more traditional review sessions and individual study. Instructors are encouraged to schedule such recitations outside RRR week whenever possible, but time and venue constraints may make the RRR period the only feasible time to do so. In such cases, instructors should maximize flexibility and scheduling options because students are likely to have other academic commitments during the RRR week. [Back]

  • Are there any exceptions granted for mandatory scheduled activities during RRR week?

    A limited number of exceptions are automatically granted for "special format" courses, such as performance- or studio-based courses, and for courses that require a capstone presentation that cannot be scheduled prior to RRR week due to time and venue constraints (see "recitation" FAQ above). Instructors are encouraged to schedule these activities outside of RRR week whenever possible. However, the campus recognizes that such courses may need to use the flexible scheduling opportunities presented by the RRR week for mandatory culminating performances, studio critiques, or capstone presentations that count toward students' final grades, particularly those activities that may require special venues. [Back]

  • Can written final examinations in undergraduate courses be given before or during RRR week?

    No. Academic Senate and campus policies prohibit the scheduling of written final examinations before or during the RRR week. [Back]

  • Can final papers or final projects in undergraduate courses that are assigned in lieu of a written final exam be due before or during RRR week?

    No. Papers or projects that are assigned in lieu of a written final exam cannot be due before or during the RRR week, according to Academic Senate and campus policies. Instructors are encouraged to give students the full benefit of the RRR week for consultation with their instructors and revision. Due dates for final papers or projects that substitute for final exams should ideally be set for the day on which the written final exam would have been given and may not be set any earlier than the first day of the final exam period. The only exception is several special cases noted above. [Back]

  • Can papers, projects or other homework assignments that are not substitute forms of final assessment be due during the RRR week?

    Yes. Papers, projects or other homework assignments that are not substitute forms of final assessment may be due during the RRR week. [Back]

  • As a student, what recourse do I have if my instructor is not following the RRR week policies for my undergraduate course?

    As a first step, you are encouraged to discuss the activity, assignment, or due date under question with your instructor, either individually or as a group. Good communication between instructors and students is an important first step. If you do not feel comfortable approaching the instructor or if such discussion does not provide a satisfactory outcome and if it still seems that RRR week activities for a particular course violate campus policy, students have several options. Students may inform the chair of the department in which the course is taught, and/or contact the Ombuds Office For Students and Postdoctoral Appointees, or may contact the ASUC Student Advocate’s Office. The Ombuds Office For Students and Postdoctoral Appointees provides an informal dispute resolution process and can be contacted at any point, including consultation before talking with the instructor or the department chair. The ASUC Student Advocate’s Office, Academic Division is a student-run organization that can help students with academic disputes. [Back]

  • Do special studies courses fall under the RRR policy?

    Yes. All undergraduate courses, including special studies courses, fall under the RRR policy. [Back]

  • Do graduate courses fall under the RRR policy?

    Graduate courses do not necessarily follow the same systemwide or campus regulations as those for undergraduate courses, and more instructor discretion in the scheduling and duration of assignments and exams is allowed. However, instructors of graduate courses are encouraged to give their students the benefits of RRR week for synthesis and review and to avoid formal class sessions during RRR week. They should also be aware that graduate students who are GSIs may have teaching responsibilities during RRR week, including ones on a schedule different from that of the formal class instruction period. [Back]

  • Do professional school programs fall under the RRR policy?

    Professional schools with programs on unique academic calendars are exempted from RRR week policy. Undergraduate courses in professional school programs on the regular academic calendar are subject to the RRR policy. Graduate courses in professional school programs on the regular academic calendar are encouraged to give their students the benefits of RRR week for synthesis and review; however, they do not necessarily follow the same systemwide or campus regulations as those for undergraduate courses (see the preceding FAQ on graduate courses). [Back]

  • I am an instructor and I would like to hold an optional review session for my class during RRR week. Can I use my regularly scheduled class time and room for the review session?  UPDATED

    Your regularly scheduled room will not be reserved during the RRR week unless you specifically request it (“opt in”). Please inform your department scheduler of your room, day and time needs for the RRR week, if any. Your scheduler will work in conjunction with the Office of the Registrar to meet your needs. First priority will be given to instructors in their regularly-scheduled classrooms, provided they indicate their needs by the mid-point of the semester. The Registrar will send e-mail to all instructors the second month of the semester to remind you to contact your department scheduler. The Academic Senate views this “opt in” policy as important because it clearly differentiates the RRR week from regular instruction and frees up rooms for instructors to hold RRR activities outside of their normally scheduled class times. [Back]

  • Can I reserve a room during RRR week at a time other than my usual class time?

    Yes. Begin by contacting your departmental scheduler, who will then submit your request to the Office of the Registrar. The Office of the Registrar will make every effort to honor your request. [Back]

  • How will the RRR days affect the work of GSIs? What types of activities will be expected of GSIs during this period?

    During the RRR period GSIs are expected to work the number of hours stipulated by their official Letter of Appointment.

    The faculty member serving as the Instructor of Record for the course should convey to GSIs what activities will be required of them during the RRR week. Possible activities may include conducting voluntary face-to-face or online review sessions, meeting with study groups, offering additional face-to-face or electronic office hours, responding to individual student questions, and giving student feedback on written work.

    In the event that the activities required of GSIs during the RRR week are significantly different from those outlined in the Letter of Appointment or Supplemental Documentation, an updated Supplemental Documentation letter reflecting these changes must be sent to the GSI as soon as reasonably possible.

    As with faculty, GSIs teaching in undergraduate courses may not introduce new material during the RRR week, nor may they administer final exams or have due dates for final written work during RRR week. They should also be made aware that student participation in all activities during the RRR week is voluntary (except in those courses with pre-approved exemptions).

    In considering the activities that will be required of GSIs, faculty must ensure that the number of hours required for assigned activities falls within the hours relating to the percentage of the Academic Student Employee (ASE)'s appointment. For more information, see Article 31, "Workload," of Collective Bargaining Agreement for ASEs. [Back]
     

FINAL EXAMS

  • What prompted the changes to schedules and procedures for conducting final exams on the Berkeley campus beginning in Spring 2010?

    Over time, issues have been raised by students and faculty related to exam administration and scheduling, as well as compliance with Senate regulations, policies, and guidelines. Changes in pedagogy in recent years have also made it timely to consider how achievement of new pedagogic goals could be included in the resolution of such problems. Specifically, a Joint Task Force on Exams (see below) was charged to examine and to make recommendations in the following areas:

    • current Academic Senate policies and guidelines on exams (both midterms and finals), including implementation of UC Systemwide Academic Senate Regulations 770 and 772, which require a written final exam that does not exceed three hours for all undergraduate courses and stipulate exceptions to that requirement;
    • practices with respect to scheduling of midterms and finals with a view to reducing conflicts for students and improving the efficient scheduling of exams;
    • current seating practices for midterm and final exams and their effects on the efficient utilization of space, as well as on recreational sports and intercollegiate athletics activities;
    • ways in which faculty (including visiting and new faculty) are informed about and acculturated to Berkeley campus exam standards, practices, and approaches to student assessment

    The Joint Task Force on Exams was convened in September 2008 by Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost George Breslauer and Academic Senate Chair Mary Firestone and completed its report on May 15, 2009. The Task Force recommendations were (1) to clarify, modernize, and streamline Senate procedures for approving alternative forms of final student assessment (other than the traditional three-hour written final exam); (2) to refine campus policies for midterm and final exam scheduling, (3) to revise the academic calendar to accommodate student desire for a longer reading period prior to final exams and to reduce scheduling conflicts for student; and (4) to improve the communication and dissemination of information related to final exams to instructors, students, and administrators. The answers to the following FAQs address the specific changes in campus policies and procedures that were recommended by the Task Force and were implemented in Spring 2010. The changes included streamlining the procedures for approval of alternative forms of final exams and the implementation of a four-exam-per-day schedule in which final exams are condensed into a five-day, Monday-through-Friday, period. [Back]

  • Why does the campus use a four-final-exams-per-day schedule?

    By following a four-per-day exam schedule, the campus is able to create a full week of RRR days, eliminate Saturday exams (and thus conflicts with Saturday religious observances and weekend family obligations), and eliminate conflicts between commencement activities and final examinations. In addition to these many benefits, this academic calendar brings the Berkeley campus exam schedule in line with other UC campuses, all of which use a four-exam-per-day schedule successfully (except for UC Irvine with a five-exam-per-day schedule). [Back]

  • What is the final exam schedule?

    The four exam periods are 8-11 am, 11:30 am-2:30 pm, 3-6 pm, and 7-10 pm, during five days of exams, given Monday through Friday. [Back]

  • The evening exam may end as late as 10 pm. What are my options for night safety?

    Safety Patrol Officers (SPOs) will be assigned to patrol venues where evening final exams are taking place.

    UCPD's Night Safety Services are FREE to all, 365 nights a year, and will be fully staffed during finals week. For info, call 2-WALK, [(510) 642-9255], or visit Bearwalk 2.0 Night Safety Services.[Back]

  • Do large numbers of students have three or more final exams per day?

    On the four-exam-per-day schedule, less than 4% of students (984 of 25,540) had three exams scheduled in one day in fall 2010, and only a very small handful of students (20 of 25,540) had four exams scheduled in one day. These numbers represent an upper limit of students.  The actual numbers are likely lower for two reasons.  First, the numbers do not include instructors who assigned an alternative form of final exam (paper or project) and did not hold an in-class final, but did not have an exemption.  They also do not take into account students who received voluntary accommodation from instructors.  The percentages are also less than what we might expect from a random distribution, suggesting that, for the most part, students are able to optimize their exam schedules successfully. In addition, an effort is made to distribute exam groups across the week to minimize these percentages, particularly for students taking large, lower division courses in which written final examinations are common. Instructors can help maintain these low percentages by not requesting a change in final exam times except under exceptional circumstances; if such circumstances do apply, instructors should request such a change at least two weeks before the first day of instruction for that semester (see Final Exam Time Change FAQ below). [Back]

  • What if I am one of the students with three or four exams scheduled in one day and I feel it is a burden?

    First, consider the exam schedule when planning your class schedule and enrolling in classes. Each class is assigned to a final exam group that you will see on Tele-BEARS and the Online Schedule of Classes. You may be able to avoid having multiple final exams in one day by enrolling in a different lecture section of the same course, if available. It is also possible that one or more of the courses may have an alternative form of final exam, such as a final paper or project, which should be announced in the syllabus at the first class meeting. If you confirm that sit-down final exams are required and that you will in fact have three or four exams on the same day, you should speak with your instructor right away (during the first two weeks of class) to see if alternate exam arrangements can be made. Instructors are not obligated to provide an alternate exam day for you, but they may be able to assist you if they have sufficient advance notice. [Back]

  • I am an instructor and I would like to have alternate seating for my final exam. How do I schedule this?  UPDATED

    All classes are assigned an exam room with seats equal to the enrollment in the fifth week, unless alternate seating (i.e., one empty seat between students) is requested. To secure alternate seating for an undergraduate exam, simply notify departmental schedulers. By the end of the fifth week of classes, they will in turn notify the Office of the Registrar, which will make the appropriate accommodation and room assignment. Requests for "double alternate seating" (i.e., two empty seats between students) cannot be granted due to space limitations. [Back]

  • Are all undergraduate courses required to have a written final exam?

    UC Systemwide Academic Senate Regulations 770 and 772 stipulate that all undergraduate courses require a written (when practicable) final exam [SR 770 & 772]. However, these regulations also stipulate that exemptions from these regulations for individual courses may be approved by each campus' Committee on Courses of Instruction (COCI). Until recently, the campus procedures to approve an alternative form of final student assessment (such as a final paper or project), or elimination of a final assessment altogether for some courses, were arguably tedious and archaic. Many instructors were not aware of these regulations or chose to ignore them. Lack of compliance with campus policy resulted in many uncertainties and scheduling conflicts for students, and rooms that could have been used for other courses stood empty during final exam periods. The Joint Task Force on Exams, with input from key Academic Senate committees, recommended that campus procedures for approving alternative forms of final student assessments be clarified, modernized, and streamlined in order to reflect changes in pedagogy in a number of academic disciplines and to facilitate compliance with the systemwide regulations. These new procedures are described in the following FAQs. [Back]

  • What alternatives are there to written final exams for undergraduate courses?

    As methods of pedagogy have changed in a number of academic fields over the years, alternative forms of final assessment, such as final projects or papers, have increasingly been substituted for a traditional, three-hour written final exam. See the Office of Educational Development for alternatives to final exams. The new COCI procedures for approving new courses or for making changes to existing courses recognize that such methods of assessment are not exceptional or unusual and may indeed be preferred in many disciplines, as explained below. [Back]

  • As an instructor, how do I request a temporary or permanent alternative to a written final exam in an undergraduate course?  UPDATED

    Instructors have several means of establishing, either for a given semester or permanently, a final student assessment other than the traditional in-person three-hour final exam:

    To change the format of a final student assessment for a course for a given semester, the instructor need only inform the students in the syllabus given out during the first week of classes and obtain approval from the chair of the department and, if applicable, the department's teaching and curriculum committee. The chair will then inform the Registrar (via the departmental scheduler) before the first day of classes that s/he has approved this form of final student assessment and that a room for a written final exam will not be needed. Such approvals by the chair can occur on a semester-by-semester basis indefinitely.

    To request a permanent change to the final student assessment format for a course or to eliminate a final exam all together, a Course Approval Form (CAF) should be completed and submitted to COCI for approval. The CAF form reflecting this new policy and procedure is now available on the UC Berkeley Academic Senate website and is explained in the updated COCI Handbook. Note that a permanent change goes with the course and not the instructor. Thus, if a different instructor wishes to change the final assessment format of a course, either the department chair can approve such a change for the course for that semester or another CAF for the change needs to be submitted to COCI. [Back]

  • Are special studies courses numbered 98/198, including but not limited to DE-Cal courses, required to have a final exam?  NEW

    No, the Committee on Courses of Instruction (COCI) has approved a permanent exemption from the final exam requirement for special studies courses numbered 98/198, including but not limited to DE-Cal courses. Assignments may be due in the last week of classes, as long as they are not designated as final exams or assessments. In general, such assignments should not have significantly more weight than other assignments given during the semester.  [Back]

  • Are graduate courses required to have a final exam?

    No, final examinations are not required in graduate courses; they are optional at the discretion of the instructor.[Back]

  • When are the final exam time and final exam format for a course announced?

    The final exam time is listed on the Online Schedule of Classes during Tele-BEARS enrollment. For an undergraduate course that has been formally approved with a written final examination, an exam group will be indicated, as will graduate courses for which written final exams are typically given. Instructors must also state the date and time of the written final exam or the due date for the final paper, project, or other alternative final assessment in the course syllabus given out during the first week of classes. [Back]

  • Can an instructor change the day and/or time of a written final examination for an undergraduate course from that officially scheduled by the Registrar?  UPDATED

    In general, no. Under exceptional circumstances, an instructor may request a change to the exam group for a course from that originally scheduled by the Office of the Registrar and published in the Online Schedule of Classes. To do so, s/he should submit this request at least two weeks before the first day of instruction for that semester to the Office of the Registrar and COCI on the Petition for Exam Group Change form in order for COCI to review the request prior to the start of instruction. Note that COCI will not review requests after the fifth week of classes. If the request for a change in final exam time is received by COCI too late to review the request before the start of instruction (but in any case no later than the fifth week of classes) and it is approved, the final exam must also still be given at the originally scheduled time in addition to the new time. This modification to existing policy is intended to ensure fairness for students who have carefully planned the distribution of their final examinations based on information in the Online Schedule of Classes and on the syllabus given out the first week of classes and to prevent students from feeling coerced into joining a "unanimous" class vote to change an exam time. Instructors may accommodate religious or other scheduling conflicts that a student or a small group of students in their course may have with the official final exam time without obtaining COCI approval (see, for example, the Religious Creed Policy and the Checklist for Scheduling Conflicts with Academic Requirements). [Back]

  • Can written final exams or alternative forms of final exams for undergraduate courses be administered or be due before the final exam period?  NEW

    No. Academic Senate and campus policies regarding undergraduate courses prohibit written final exams or alternative forms of final exams from being administered or due before the final exam period. A limited exception is provided for "special format" courses, such as performance- or studio-based courses, that require a capstone presentation as an alternative form of final exam that cannot be held during the final exam period due to venue or time constraints (see above for more information). [Back]

  • Can an instructor change the day and/or time of a written final examination for a graduate course from that officially scheduled by the Registrar?

    As noted above, final examinations are not required in graduate courses; they are optional at the discretion of the instructor. Changes to the schedule of a graduate course’s final examination do not require COCI’s approval, but the department must notify Classroom Scheduling at osoc@berkeley.edu. [Back]

  • Can an instructor change the method of final student assessment for an undergraduate course after the first week of classes?

    If an instructor wishes to change the method of final student assessment (e.g., paper, project, or written exam) after the first week of classes for an undergraduate course, the department chair must give approval (as noted above) and students must be given the option of being evaluated by the method originally described in the syllabus given out the first week of classes. [Back]

  • As a student, what recourse do I have if my instructor is not following the campus final exam policies for my undergraduate course?

    As a first step, you are encouraged to discuss any perceived problems with the final exam scheduling or format with the instructor, either individually or as a group. If you are unable to come to a satisfactory resolution of the problem with the instructor and you still believe that the final exam format or its scheduling violates campus policy, you may inform the chair of the department in which the course is taught and/or contact the Ombuds Office For Students and Postdoctoral Appointees. The Ombuds Office provides an informal dispute resolution process and can be contacted at any point, including consultation before talking with the instructor or the department chair. You may also contact the ASUC Student Advocate’s Office, Academic Division, a student-run organization that can assist you with any academic dispute. [Back]

  • As a member of the UC Berkeley community, how do I find out more about my rights and responsibilities surrounding final exams?

    Students, instructors, department chairs, the Registrar, and other campus groups have certain rights and responsibilities with regard to final examinations. Knowledge of these will help keep the system running smoothly and minimize conflicts and misunderstandings. Please visit the Office of the Registrar's Final Exam Responsibilities website (which is also accessible from the Online Schedule of Classes) for concise and up-to-date information as well as links to more detailed discussions of campus policies and procedures.[Back]
     

MIDTERM EXAMS

  • As an instructor, what are my responsibilities in scheduling midterm examinations?

    The specific date and time of midterm exams that will be held outside the regularly scheduled class time must be stated in writing in the syllabus distributed by instructors during the first week of classes. Conflicts should be handled as outlined in the Religious Creed Policy or Checklist for Scheduling Conflicts with Academic Requirements for extracurricular activities. [Back]

  • As an instructor, how do I request a room for a midterm examination I want to schedule at a time and place different from that of the class?

    Contact your departmental scheduler as early as possible to request a room for a midterm exam, since the campus is now at capacity for large rooms during key weeks in the semester. Your scheduler will submit the request to the Office of the Registrar. In some cases, the Office of the Registrar may be able to notify you of potential conflicts with other large enrollment courses. [Back]

  • As a student, what are my responsibilities if I have a conflict with a midterm examination?

    Students are responsible for notifying instructors within the first two weeks of classes about foreseeable conflicts and for proposing potential solutions to the conflicts. For unanticipated conflicts, students should contact their instructor as soon as possible. Conflicts should be resolved according to the Religious Creed Policy or as outlined in the Checklist for Scheduling Conflicts with Academic Requirements for extracurricular activities. Be aware that multiple, unresolvable conflicts with extracurricular activities may prohibit you from taking a particular course. [Back]
     

COMMENCEMENT

  • Can commencement ceremonies be held during final exam week?

    Effective spring 2010, campus policy requires that graduation ceremonies must take place after final examinations have concluded, with the exception of professional schools with graduate students only. [Back]

  • I am a graduating student. How do I find out when the Commencement Convocation and my departmental commencement ceremony will be held?

    Information about Commencement Convocation, the campuswide event for all graduating students hosted by the Chancellor, may be found at the Cal Senior Gift Campaign.

    Information about departmental commencements will be posted on the Commencement at Cal website as they are confirmed. If your department’s information is not listed, please contact the unit directly. [Back]
     

OTHER QUESTIONS

This page was last updated on Friday, December 06, 2013